Accepting Outside Help: You’re Not Giving Up

Published on July 9th, 2014

For what seems like years, you’ve been telling yourself, he’s just going through a phase, or she’s only being a teenager. But at some point you’ve realized other teenagers don’t engage in the same level of destructive behavior as your child. So where do you go from here?

The good news is you and your teen can get the necessary help to overcome these behavioral issues. From individual and family therapy to drug or alcohol rehabilitation, there are a variety of options to choose from. The first step is to identify the problem: does she struggle with anxiety, social awkwardness, drug abuse, or some other root issue? By contacting a specialist, you can find answers to these questions and more.

Remember, accepting outside help doesn’t mean you’ve given up. In fact, it means you care enough about your child to get him the resources he or she needs to improve. By working with a professional, you can do the following:

1. Restructure Your Life

If you’re like most parents who have teenagers with behavioral problems, you’ve spent years tip-toeing around the issue—afraid of “setting your child off.” By working with an expert, you’ll begin to understand what you and your family can do to encourage development and healing for your troubled teen.

For example, the brain does not reach full maturity until the mid-20s—causing teenagers to often misread facial expressions. Misguidedly, they see anger in your face more often than you probably realize. An expert will help you work with your teen to overcome these instances of miscommunication.

2. Gain Confidence

Does your child exhibit violent or aggressive behavior? Boys often show anger by punching walls, throwing objects, or kicking furniture, while girls usually express anger through verbal abuse. Any of these activities can cause you to live in fear in your own home. By working with outside help, your child can find healthy ways to deal with his anger. As a result, you’ll find that your family will begin to slowly heal and reconnect.

3. Empower Your Teenager

With all the behavioral issues, anger and destruction you deal with, it can be difficult to remember that your teen still craves love and acceptance from you. After participating in family therapy, many parents find that they have more influence over their child than they think. Whether you work with a counselor, therapist, or rehabilitationilitation specialist, you’ll gain access to resources that will help you empower your teenager for positive change. Little by little, you and your child will find a healthy balance within the home. And with the right amount of encouragement from you, your child will begin to feel the confidence he or she has been lacking.

Taking that First Step: Beginning the Healing Process

Taking the first step toward getting outside help is never easy. Many parents feel that contacting a professional is a sign of weakness, or that it somehow means they’ve given up. In the end, many parents and their teenagers can only begin healing when they accept the help so desperately need.

For help in this difficult time, contact Options Family & Behavior Services by calling (952) 564-3000.

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